Curriculum

The curriculum at The Torrington Preschool Center is aligned with the Connecticut Framework: Preschool Curricular Goals and Benchmarks.  This document establishes content standards and performance indicators for preschool programs in Connecticut.

 

 In other words, it outlines what preschool children in Connecticut should know and what skills children should be able to demonstrate by the end of preschool. It is the framework linking the preschool standards to the existing Kindergarten through Grade Twelve curriculum standards.


The Torrington Preschool Center staff attended professional training sessions to learn about the state preschool standards.  We were also selected to work collaboratively on a committee that developed and published The Companion Guide to The Connecticut Preschool Curriculum Framework.

 

The Torrington Preschool Center has incorporated the Connecticut Framework performance standards into our existing curriculum connecting to the Connecticut preschool standards.

At the Torrington Preschool Center, the Connecticut Framework is in action every day. Our curriculum reflects intentional teaching strategies where children develop their personal/social, physical, cognitive and creative skills while they work and play.

 

We work very diligently in order to give each child the very best preschool experience. We are proud to offer the best practice in preschool education. Get ready for a successful transition into kindergarten!

 

Opening the Kindergarten Door
The Preschool Difference
Executive Summary


A Study initiated by the Connecticut Commission on Children, and supported by the State Department of Connecticut for School Change was summarized in the following article:

 

 

Finding 1: Language and Literacy Skills:
Children with two years of preschool were twice as likely to be seen as “ready for kindergarten” in language and literacy skills than their peers without preschool.

Finding 2: Math Skills: Children with two years of preschool were twice as likely to be seen as “ready for kindergarten” in math skills than their peers without preschool.

Finding 3: Social/Emotional Skills: Children with two years of preschool were one and a half times as likely to be seen as “ready for kindergarten” in social/emotional skills than their peers without preschool.

Finding 4: Fine Motor Skills: Children with two years of preschool were one and a half times as likely to be seen as “ready for kindergarten” in fine motor skills than their peers without preschool.

Finding 5: All Skill Areas: Children with two years of preschool fared significantly better in language and literacy, math, social/emotional and fine motor skills than children with one year of preschool.